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Key Largo Dive 01

A diver explores the coral reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. The reef system is the only contiguous coral barrier reef in North America. Photo by Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau

Key Largo Dive 02

A diver explores the coral reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. The reef system in the Keys is the only contiguous coral barrier reef in North America. Photo by Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau

John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park 02

Katherine Wieland, left, and Cody Wagner, right snorkel over the "Christ of the Deep" statue, an underwater icon for John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park. Named after a former Miami newspaper editor, Pennekamp is the nation's first underwater preserve and is the predecessor to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that protects the entire waters off the Keys island chain. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau)

Key Largo Christ Statue

Snorkeler Katherine Wieland examines the "Christ of the Deep" statue in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. This nine-foot-tall, 4,000 pound replica of a similar statue, located in the waters off the coast of Italy, is submerged in 25 feet of water at Key Largo Dry Rocks. Photo by Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau

Florida Keys Coral Spawn 01

Key Largo, Fla., diver Penny Bailey observes tiny eggs and sperm erupt from a portion of the Florida Keys' coral reef during a reef spawning phenomenon late Friday, Sept. 3, 1999. Though difficult to predict exact timing, each year in the late summer corals explode, shooting millions of eggs and sperm toward the water s surface, where some ultimately unite to breed infant corals. The exhibition can look like an upside-down snowstorm. (AP Photo/Monroe County Tourism, Bob Care)

Florida Keys Coral Spawn 02

In this photo, released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Spencer Slate watches a boulder coral release gametes early Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011, off Key Largo, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The coral was one of many off the Keys that reproduced during the once-a-year mass-spawning ritual that many divers describe as an upside-down snowfall. The reproduction ritual normally occurs several days after the full moon in either August or September. (AP Photo/Florida Keys News Bureau, Frazier Nivens)

Florida Keys Coral Spawn 03

A female pillar coral releases eggs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla., late Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission researchers said it was the first time anyone has observed female pillar coral spawning and until Saturday, it was unclear if female pillar coral species existed in Florida waters. Karen Neely/FWC via the Florida Keys News Bureau

Spiegel Grove 01

Annette Robertson explores a portion of the artificial reef Spiegel Grove Wednesday, May 16, 2012, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, off Key Largo, Fla. Thursday, May 17, marks the 10th anniversary of the former 510-foot, U.S. Navy landing ship dock's scuttling to become an artificial reef. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

Spiegel Grove 02

Annette Robertson explores a portion of the artificial reef Spiegel Grove Wednesday, May 16, 2012, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, off Key Largo, Fla. Thursday, May 17, marks the 10th anniversary of the former 510-foot, U.S. Navy landing ship dock's scuttling to become an artificial reef. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

Spiegel Grove 03

In this May 17, 2002, photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, the Spiegel Grove rolls over after it sunk prematurely in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The vessel was being prepared to be intentionally sunk as an artificial reef, but began taking on water faster than expected. All personnel evacuated the ship without incident and about three weeks later, a salvage crew fully sunk the former U.S. Navy landing ship dock on its starboard side. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Sergio Garcia/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

Spiegel Grove 04

In this May 30, 2002, file photo, the upside-down hull of the Spiegel Grove lies off Key Largo, Fla., as salvage divers make preparations to rotate and fully sink the 510-foot retired Navy vessel as an artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

Spiegel Grove 05

In this June 26, 2002, file photo, diver Paul Caputo swims near the forward deck of the Spiegel Grove, a retired Navy landing ship dock that was sunk in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. A thin sheen of algae has begun to build upon vessel's surfaces that will serve as foundation for the development of coral. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Vandenberg Wreck 01

Divers complete deploying a huge American flag Friday, July 4, 2014, on the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a former military troop transport and missile-tracking ship scuttled more than five years ago off Key West, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary as an artificial reef. The 30- by 40-foot flag, formerly flew at a Morris, Illinois, memorial park for Sept. 11, 2001, New York City terrorists' attack victims. But the flag was scheduled for retirement after being badly tattered by weather. It was to be retired after being tattered by weather, but Morris attorney Scott Belt conceived the idea of mending the flag and unfurling it on the Vandenberg. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Joe Berg/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Vandenberg Wreck 02

Divers deploy a huge American flag Friday, July 4, 2014, on the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a former military troop transport and missile-tracking ship scuttled more than five years ago off Key West, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary as an artificial reef. The 30- by 40-foot flag, formerly flew at a Morris, Illinois, memorial park for Sept. 11, 2001, New York City terrorists' attack victims. But the flag was scheduled for retirement after being badly tattered by weather. It was to be retired after being tattered by weather, but Morris attorney Scott Belt conceived the idea of mending the flag and unfurling it on the Vandenberg. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Scott Belt/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Vandenberg Wreck 03

Divers deploy an American flag on the artificial reef USNS General Hoyt S. Vandenberg Sunday, May 25, 2014, about seven miles off Key West, Fla. The flag not only pays a Memorial Day tribute to the men who served on the Vandenberg between 1943 and 1983, but also marks the 5th anniversary of the vessel's May 27, 2009, scuttling in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary as an artificial reef. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Joe Berg/Florida Keys News Bureau, HO)

2011 Vandenberg 01

A diver examines art photos created by Austrian photographer Andreas Franke as he swims along the deck of Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef 90 feet deep in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011, off Key West, Fla. Franke created and installed a dozen digitally composited images for the underwater art exhibition. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andreas Franke/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2011 Vandenberg 02

Divers examine art photos created by Austrian photographer Andreas Franke along the deck of Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef 90 feet deep in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011, off Key West, Fla. Franke created and installed a dozen digitally composited images for the underwater art exhibition. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andreas Franke/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2010 Vandenberg 01

Divers swim above the former missile-tracking ship Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg Friday, May 21, 2010, off Key West, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Algae and sponges are already growing on exterior surfaces of of the 523-foot-long vessel and more than 113 different species of fish are now calling it home. The artificial reef was intentionally sunk May 27, 2009. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Don Kincaid/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2010 Vandenberg 02

Divers swim over the former missile-tracking ship Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg amid thousands of fish Friday, May 21, 2010, off Key West, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. A year after the ship was intentionally sunk May 27, 2009, the artificial reef has attracted more than 20,000 divers and 113 different species of fish. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Don Kincaid/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2009 Vandenberg 01

Divers explore the superstructure of the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key West, Fla., Friday, May 29, 2009. After a dramatic May 27 scuttling, the Vandenberg opened to the public Saturday, May 30. The Vandenberg's hull rests on the sandy bottom in about 145 feet of water, but the 523-foot-long former U.S. Air Force missile tracking ship is so massive that its superstructure begins just 45 feet below the sea surface. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Haig Jacobs/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2009 Vandenberg 02

Divers explore the superstructure of the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key West, Fla., Friday, May 29, 2009. After a dramatic May 27 scuttling, the Vandenberg opened to the public Saturday, May 30. The Vandenberg's hull rests on the sandy bottom in about 145 feet of water, but the 523-foot-long former U.S. Air Force missile tracking ship is so massive that its superstructure begins just 45 feet below the sea surface. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Haig Jacobs/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2009 Vandenberg 03

Diver Jaclyn Skafas swims above a parabolic tracking antenna on the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key West, Fla., during Friday, May 29, 2009. After a dramatic scuttling on May 27, the former Air Force missile-tracking ship opened to the public Saturday, May 30. It is the second largest ship in the world to be intentionally sunk to create an artificial reef for sport divers and anglers. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR USE BY NORTH AMERICAN DIVE PUBLICATIONS OR NORTH AMERICAN DIVE WEB SITES PRIOR TO OCT. 1, 2009. (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2009 Vandenberg 04

Diver Jaclyn Skafas explores the superstructure of the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key West, Fla. Friday, May 29, 2009. After a dramatic May 27 scuttling, the Vandenberg opened to the public Saturday, May 30. The hull of the vessel rests on the sandy bottom in about 145 feet of water, but the 523-foot-long former U.S. Air Force missile tracking ship is so massive that its superstructure begins just 45 feet below the sea surface. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR USE BY NORTH AMERICAN DIVE PUBLICATIONS OR NORTH AMERICAN DIVE WEB SITES PRIOR TO OCT. 1, 2009. (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2009 Vandenberg 05

Joe Weatherby, left, who 13 years ago identified the former U.S. Air Force missile-tracking ship Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg as a candidate for sinking as an artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, is congratulated by Monroe County Commissioner Mario Di Gennaro, right, after tying a Conch Republic flag to a stanchion on the Vandenberg May 29, 2009, sunk about seven miles off Key West, Fla., in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Following a dramatic May 27, 2009, scuttling, the Vandenberg officially opened to sport divers and anglers May 30. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR USE BY NORTH AMERICAN DIVE PUBLICATIONS OR NORTH AMERICAN DIVE WEB SITES PRIOR TO OCT. 1, 2009. (Stephen Frink/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2015 Underwater Music Festival 01

Jeff Wright, costumed as a seahorse, rocks with a fake guitar Saturday, July 11, 2015, during the Underwater Music Festival in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Big Pine Key, Fla. The annual event attracted hundreds of divers and snorkelers who listened to a local radio station's four-hour broadcast piped beneath the sea via underwater speakers, featuring music programmed for the subsea listening experience as well as coral reef conservation messages. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2015 Underwater Music Festival 02

Kaitlin Goddard, left, costumed as superhero, blows through an artist's flying fish whistle Saturday, July 11, 2015, during the Underwater Music Festival in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Big Pine Key, Fla. At right is mermaid Sarah Brunner. The annual event attracted hundreds of divers and snorkelers who listened to a local radio station's four-hour broadcast piped beneath the sea via underwater speakers, featuring music programmed for the subsea listening experience as well as coral reef conservation messages. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2015 Underwater Music Festival 03

Sarah Brunner, costumed as a mermaid, pretends to play a starfish guitar Saturday, July 11, 2015, during the Underwater Music Festival in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Big Pine Key, Fla. The annual event attracted hundreds of divers and snorkelers who listened to a local radio station's four-hour broadcast piped beneath the sea via underwater speakers, featuring music programmed for the subsea listening experience as well as coral reef conservation messages. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2015 Underwater Music Festival 04

Marathon swimmer Diana Nyad swims during the Underwater Music Festival Saturday, July 11, 2015, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Big Pine Key, Fla. Nyad was one of hundred of participants who listened to a local radio station's four-hour broadcast piped beneath the sea via underwater speakers, featuring music programmed for the subsea listening experience as well as coral reef conservation messages. In September 2013, Nyad became the first person to ever swim from Cuba to the Florida Keys without a shark cage. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Underwater Pumpkin Carving 01

Dan Minnick pares a pumpkin at the Underwater Pumpkin Carving Contest Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. Minnick was among a group of divers who submerged 30 feet beneath the surface about six miles off Key Largo to carve jack-o-lanterns during the contest organized by the Amoray Dive Resort. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Underwater Pumpkin Carving 02

Jana Vandelaar eyes her version of a Sponge Bob Square Pants pumpkin at the Underwater Pumpkin Carving Contest Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. Vandelaar was among a group of divers who submerged 30 feet beneath the surface about six miles off Key Largo to carve jack-o-lanterns during the contest organized by the Amoray Dive Resort. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2014 Underwater Pumpkin Carving 03

Participants in the Underwater Pumpkin Carving Contest pose with their creations Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. Divers submerged 30 feet beneath the surface about six miles off Key Largo to carve jack-o-lanterns during the contest organized by the Amoray Dive Resort. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Bob Care/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)