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2016 Stone Crab Eating Contest 05

Juan Mallen, second from left, gobbles down stone crab claw meat during the Stone Crab Eating Contest Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, at Keys Fisheries in Marathon, Fla. Mallen cracked and consumed 25 stone crab claws in 12 minutes and 54 seconds to take top honors and set a new contest record. About 40 percent of Florida's stone crab harvest comes from Florida Keys waters, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission fisheries' data. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2016 Stone Crab Eating Contest 04

Juan Mallen, left, raises his hands in victory after he cracked and consumed 25 stone crab claws in 12 minutes and 54 second to win the Stone Crab Eating Contest Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, at Keys Fisheries in Marathon, Fla. Malle, a 49-year-old commercial appliance technician from Miami, set a new contest record. Stone crabs are a renewable resource. Legal-size claws are harvested and the crabs are returned to the water to grow new extremities. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2016 Stone Crab Eating Contest 03

Sally Mishmash, left, and Sandra Bradshaw, feed each other stone crab claws during the Stone Crab Eating Contest Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, at Keys Fisheries in Marathon, Fla. The event attracted 40 competitors who participated in both individual and team categories. To win, contestants had to crack and eat 25 stone crab claws in the fastest time. About 40 percent of Florida's stone crab harvest comes from Florida Keys waters, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission fisheries data. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2016 Stone Crab Eating Contest 02

Sandra Bradshaw pulls meat out of a stone crab claw during the Stone Crab Eating Contest Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, at Keys Fisheries in Marathon, Fla. The event attracted 40 competitors who participated in both individual and team categories. To win, contestants had to crack and eat 25 stone crab claws in the fastest time. Stone crabs are a renewable resource. Legal-size claws are harvested and the crabs are returned to the water to grow new extremities. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)

2016 Stone Crab Eating Contest 01

Contestants crack and consume crab meat during the Stone Crab Eating Contest Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, at Keys Fisheries in Marathon, Fla. The event attracted 40 competitors who participated in both individual and team categories. To win, contestants had to crack and eat 25 stone crab claws in the fastest time. About 40 percent of Florida's stone crab harvest comes from Florida Keys waters, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission fisheries data. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY (Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau/HO)